Convent Chronicles: Women Writing About Women And Reform In The Late Middle Ages
Convent Chronicles: Women Writing About Women And Reform In The Late Middle Ages
Convent Chronicles: Women Writing About Women And Reform In The Late Middle Ages
Type: eBook
Released: 2004
Page Count: 345
Format: pdf
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0271024607
ISBN-13: 9780271031835

Review

I can think of no other study in English that covers this material so amply or so well. It will be of use to scholars in the field as well as to graduate and undergraduate students interested in exploring the history of women's monasticism and religious writing. I can easily imagine this becoming an important book for classroom use since there is little if anything else available that deals with this particular moment in Christian women's monastic and religious history. --Amy Hollywood, University of Chicago

Anne Winston-Allen sheds a bright light on [an era of reform] in Convent Chronicles: Women Writing About Women and Reform in the Late Middle Ages. She takes the reader beyond the few well-known writers of a mostly earlier time, such as Hildegard of Bingen, to explore the writings of many women whose lives were influential in ways large and small. --Judith Sutera, National Catholic Reporter

Anne Winston-Allen breaks new ground in Convent Chronicles, studying texts that are all but unknown and challenging the notion that there were no, or too few, texts written by women in the Middle Ages. By exploring broad-ranging issues, she puts to rest the 'woman as victim' question. She shows that, quite to the contrary, women fought for what they believed in and actively resisted when their positions were challenged. Likewise, women were producers of important works that give us entirely new insights into female religiosity and its distinctiveness in the late Middle Ages. --Larissa Taylor, Colby College
--This text refers to the

edition.

From the Back Cover

"Anne Winston-Allen breaks new ground in Convent Chronicles, studying texts that are all but unknown and challenging the notion that there were no, or too few, texts written by women in the Middle Ages. By exploring broad-ranging issues, she puts to rest the 'woman as victim' question. She shows that, quite to the contrary, women fought for what they believed in and actively resisted when their positions were challenged. Likewise, women were producers of important works that give us entirely new insights into female religiosity and its distinctiveness in the late Middle Ages." —Larissa Taylor, Colby College

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